Artificial Intelligence & Law Colloquium: Sonia Katyal

Monday, February 10 at 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Education Building (EDU), 1111
401 East Peltason Drive Irvine, CA 92697-8000




Private Accountability in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

Sonia Katyal
Co-Director, Berkeley Center for Law & Technology; Distinguished Haas Chair, Berkeley Law

Citation: Sonia K. Katyal, Private Accountability in the Age of Artificial Intelligence, 66 UCLA L. REV. 54 (2019).

Abstract
This Article explores the impending conflict between the protection of civil rights and artificial intelligence (AI). While both areas of law have amassed rich and well-developed areas of scholarly work and doctrinal support, a growing body of scholars are interrogating the intersection between them. This Article argues that the issues surrounding algorithmic accountability demonstrate a deeper, more structural tension within a new generation of disputes regarding law and technology. The true promise of AI does not lie in the information we reveal to one another, but rather in the questions it raises about the interaction of technology, property, and civil rights. For this reason, it argues that we are looking in the wrong place if we look only to the state to address issues of algorithmic accountability. Instead, given the state's reluctance to address the issue, we must turn to other ways to ensure more transparency and accountability that stem from private industry, rather than public regulation. The issue of algorithmic bias represents a crucial new world of civil rights concerns, one that is distinct in nature from the ones that preceded it. Since we are in a world where the activities of private corporations, rather than the state, are raising concerns about privacy, due process, and discrimination, we must focus on the role of private corporations in addressing the issue. Towards this end, this Article discusses a variety of tools to help eliminate the opacity of AI, including codes of conduct, impact statements, and whistleblower protections, which it argues carry the potential to encourage greater endogeneity in civil rights enforcement. Ultimately, by examining the relationship between private industry and civil rights, we can perhaps develop a new generation of forms of accountability in the process.

Lunch will be served.

This event is pending approval of Minimum Continuing Legal Education Credit by the State Bar of California. UCI Law is a State Bar-approved provider.

About the Colloquium
Machine learning and automated decision-making technologies (colloquially dubbed "artificial intelligence" or "AI") are an increasingly integral feature of social systems. These technologies raise novel legal questions regarding oversight, individual rights, liability and justice. The UCI Law Spring 2020 Colloquium on AI & Law brings to campus leading thinkers engaged with these issues.

Event Type

Speaker/Lecture/Workshop/Seminar

Audience

Students, Staff, Faculty, Alumni, General Public

Website

https://www.law.uci.edu/events/ai-col...

Cost

Free

Department
UCI Law
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